From Text File to Map in 30 Minutes

I wanted to see where United States patent attorneys reside. Using data from the United States Patent and Trademark Office and a free account from Microsoft’s Power BI, I was able to create the two visualizations below in about 30 minutes. Pretty amazing. Let me know if you want any details on how to do this – I sketched out the process below.

https://app.powerbi.com/view?r=eyJrIjoiMmI4N2Y0NWUtY2MyMi00NjQwLWE5MTMtNGRmMzdlMDVlMjBhIiwidCI6ImRmM2ZmMTE5LWU4N2MtNDlmNy1hM2IxLTY2NzdkMzAzOGZlMSIsImMiOjZ9

Steps to Create Power BI Map Visualization

  • Grab data: text file of all active US Patent Attorneys can be found here: https://oedci.uspto.gov/OEDCI/practitionerRoster.jsp
  • Visit Power BI Getting Started Page https://powerbi.microsoft.com/en-us/get-started/ so you can:
    • Download the Software (this allows you to author your visualizations); AND
    • Sign Up for a Power BI account (this allows you to publish your visualizations to the web)
  • Once you have downloaded the Desktop Power BI software, create a new report (File > New).
  • Click on Get Data > File > Text, and point to the file you downloaded (you need to extract it from the zip file if you have not already done that).
  • There are two types of maps in Power BI: maps and filled maps; I used maps that represents each node as a bubble.
  • For the top left map, just drag the City on to the Location box.
  • For the bottom left map, drag State on to the Location box, and drag State on to Size; click on the State under Size, and make sure Count is selected (not Count Distinct).
  • Finally, add a couple of tables to the right. For the top map, drag over City and Firm Name under values, and then click on the down arrow for Firm Name and select Count (this will aggregate for the city instead of showing all of the Firm Names along with their city).
    • I should have used registration number, instead of Firm Name, because this is actually a count of FIRMS by city, not a count of practitioners. Alas,  if that is the worst mistake I make today I am doing all right.
  • On the desktop, you can now click on the Publish icon in the top right.
  • Now navigate to the web version of Power BI and navigate to your app.
  • Under File select “Publish to Web”
  • Grab the “HTML you can add to your website” and paste this into a text view of your blog, and you are done. Super easy.

If you have published or stumbled upon some nice Power BI visualizations, drop them in a comment. I am a bit surprised this has not become more common. My prediction: data visualizations will become the norm in 2017, because all of these visualization tools are racing to become the standard, and are breaking down the barriers to adoption that have historically prevented people from jumping in (primarily complexity and cost). Exciting times.

Thanks.

Matt